Kasich: 'I Just Don't Think There's Any Policy Here' on Health, International Allies and Trade

Kasich: 'I Just Don't Think There's Any Policy Here' on Health, International Allies and TradeIn an exclusive inventive, Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio) tells Chuck Todd that the White House is "weakening" long-standing international alliance and allowing authoritarian governments to rise.


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    California wildfire 'blast' kills teen, injures his family

    California wildfire 'blast' kills teen, injures his familyWhen flames swept over the mountain like a "nuclear blast," Paul Hanssen ran from his burning home, a water-soaked towel around his head and dog by his side, and took shelter in a trailer. He waited nervously for two long hours as winds howled and embers flew by.


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      Wild elephants trample to death four Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh

      Wild elephants trample to death four Rohingya refugees in BangladeshCOX’S BAZAR, Bangladesh (Reuters) – Wild elephants trampled sleeping Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh in the early hours of Saturday, killing three children and a woman in the second such incident since the arrival of hundreds of thousands of refugees from Myanmar in just a few weeks. Many trees on the forested hills of Balukhali in southern Bangladesh, where the incident took place, have been chopped down to house the massive influx of Rohingya Muslims escaping violence in neighboring Myanmar. Tarpaulin and bamboo shelters have been built on elephant walkways in some areas, sparking environmental concerns, as the country struggles to accommodate an unprecedented number of people.


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        Syria demands 'immediate' withdrawal of Turkey troops: SANA

        Syria demands 'immediate' withdrawal of Turkey troops: SANASyria on Saturday demanded the “immediate and unconditional withdrawal” of Turkish troops that have deployed in the country’s northwestern province of Idlib, state media said citing a foreign ministry source. Turkish troops entered Idlib on Thursday night as part of efforts to enforce a so-called “de-escalation zone” agreed by rebel backer Ankara and regime allies Russia and Iran at talks in Astana earlier this year.


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          Tampa opens arms to Puerto Rico evacuees

          Tampa opens arms to Puerto Rico evacueesThe city of Tampa is preparing for an influx of Puerto Rico evacuees following Hurricane Maria.


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            CA Wildfires: Couple Awakes to Leaping Flames

            CA Wildfires: Couple Awakes to Leaping FlamesA couple woke up choking from the flames in the California wildfires, narrowly escaping. Today, they visit their destroyed home, one of at least 5,700 structures scorched across the state.


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              Michele Bachmann Offers Her Thoughts On Donald Trump Being A 'Man Of Faith'

              Michele Bachmann Offers Her Thoughts On Donald Trump Being A 'Man Of Faith'At the annual Values Voter Summit (VVS) in Washington this weekend, former congresswoman Michele Bachmann, who serves on Donald Trump’s evangelical advisory board, said in an interview with me on SiriusXM Progress that Donald Trump is now a “committed believer” of Jesus Christ and “man of faith” who has “asked God for help and wisdom.”


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                The 27 best scary movies on Netflix

                The Bad Batch Netflix

                It’s time to dive into the best horror movies currently on Netflix.

                With Halloween around the corner, we’ve come up with the best on the streaming giant so you can enjoy the rest of the month scaring the heck out of yourself and your friends.

                Check out the 27 scary movies below.

                Note: Numerous Netflix titles drop off the streaming service monthly so the availability of titles below may change.

                Brett Arnold contributed to an earlier version of this story.

                SEE ALSO: 100 movies on Netflix that everyone needs to watch in their lifetime

                1. “The ABCs of Death” (2012)

                26 horror directors are each given a letter of the alphabet as a starting point to create a scary short.

                2. “The Babadook” (2014)

                A single mother struggling to keep up with her rambunctious son begins to lose it after a strange children’s book comes to her doorstep.

                3. “The Bad Batch” (2016)

                Set in a dystopian future where the bad are thrown into a cannibal-filled wasteland in Texas, a girl (Suki Waterhouse) tries to survive. Movie stars Jason Momoa, Keanu Reeves, and an unrecognizable Jim Carrey. 

                See the rest of the story at Business Insider


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                  These maps show how much damage a North Korean thermonuclear weapon could do to major American cities

                  nuclear bomb explosion blast city shutterstock_639638614

                  Nuclear weapons may be humanity’s most terrifying creations, but most people would be hard-pressed to say what, exactly, such an explosion might do to their town or city.

                  To help the public get a handle on nuclear threats, Alex Wellerstein, a historian of science at Stevens Institute of Technology, created Nukemap: an interactive simulator that lets you set off a nuke anywhere on a world map.

                  A recent update even lets you predict where clouds of radioactive fallout might drift based on current weather.

                  “A realistic understanding of what nuclear weapons can and can’t do is necessary for any discussion that involves them,” Wellerstein previously told Business Insider. “People tend to have either wildly exaggerated views of the weapons, or wildly under-appreciate their power.”

                  Given rising public interest in North Korea’s intercontinental ballistic missile and nuclear test programs, Wellerstein recently added the isolated nation’s Sept. 3 underground blast — its most powerful yet — to a list of preset options in Nukemap.

                  The device may have been a thermonuclear bomb since it yielded an explosion of roughly 150 kilotons’ worth of TNT. That’s about 10 times as strong as the Hiroshima bomb blast of 1945, which inflicted some 150,000 casualties.

                  Although a nuclear-tipped North Korean missile couldn’t reach most of the continental US (yet), and casualties are notoriously tough to estimate, the images below show what could happen if a 150-kiloton warhead hit major American cities.

                  We chose the 10 following US cities because they are the most densely populated, and ranked them based on estimated loss of life.

                  SEE ALSO: Why Trump’s call for a nuclear arms race is the most dangerous thing he’s ever said

                  DON’T MISS: The countries that have nuclear weapons and how many they possess

                  We used Google Earth Pro to 3D-illustrate each scenario from Nukemap (which now has a convenient export feature to the app). Here’s what the blast result colors mean:

                  Yellow: Fireball (0.56 miles wide, 1.03 miles high) — In the area closest to the bomb’s detonation site, flames would incinerate most buildings, objects, and people.

                  Green: Radiation (1.24 miles wide) — A nuclear bomb’s gamma and other radiation are so intense in this zone that 50% or more of people die within “several hours to several weeks,” according to Nukemap.

                  Blue-gray: Air blast (4.64 miles wide) — This shows a blast area with 5 pounds per square inch of pressure, which is powerful enough to collapse most residential buildings and rupture eardrums. “Injuries are universal, fatalities are widespread,” Nukemap says.

                  Orange: Thermal radiation (6.54 miles wide) — This region is flooded with skin-scorching ultraviolet light, burning anyone within view of the blast. “Third-degree burns extend throughout the layers of skin and are often painless because they destroy the pain nerves,” Nukemap says. “They can cause severe scarring or disablement, and can require amputation.”

                  Tampa, Florida: 67,000 dead, 161,000 injured

                  The blasts we use to estimate deaths and injuries are 150-kiloton airbursts detonated about 1 mile above the ground. Nuclear weapons inflict the most damage as airbursts — detonating the bombs hundreds or thousands of feet above a target spreads blast energy more efficiently. That makes a bomb more deadly than if it were detonated on the ground, since soil and structures can absorb or block some of that energy. 

                  This 150-kiloton blast over Tampa could destroy:

                  - 54 hospitals and medical facilities
                  - Two fire stations
                  - 46 schools and educational facilities
                  - 74 churches, synagogues, mosques, and other places of worship

                  In the event of a 150-kiloton surface detonation in Tampa, the nearby city of St. Petersburg may get a deadly dose of fallout.

                  Airbursts create little radioactive fallout compared to surface blasts, which suck up debris, irradiate it, and spread it for hundreds of miles. An airburst strike isn’t guaranteed, however, so we’ve included predictions of fallout clouds from ground detonations to provide a sense of how far this threat can travel.

                  We used Nukemap’s estimation of where fallout would travel based on the prevailing winds on Thursday, October 12. We’ll note, however, that fallout clouds usually take on a more complex shape due to high-altitude winds.

                  See the rest of the story at Business Insider


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                    We tried 3 meals from a vegan vending machine that’s about to blow up the fast-food scene — here’s the verdict

                    leCupboard subway station

                    • leCupboard dispenses healthy, personalized, prepared meals out of machines.
                    • We tried out three leCupboard dishes — two meals and a dessert — and the taste blew us away.
                    • Founder Lamiaa Bounahmidi believes the startup helps address nutritional problems that arise when people choose convenience over health.

                    Lamiaa Bounahmidi may have a solution to your diet woes: a vending machine.

                    Bounahmidi is leading a San Francisco-based startup called leCupboard, which dispenses healthy, personalized, prepared meals out of vending machines. The startup’s goal is to get people to think differently about healthy food by making it as convenient as fast-food.

                    Customers simply press a button on one of the machines — which Bounahmidi calls “cupboards” — and out comes a vegan snack or meal in a reusable glass container. The dishes range in price from $6-$13, and most are high in protein and whole grains. 

                    LeCupboard’s seven locations are all in downtown San Francisco, in semi-private spaces like coworking areas, schools, and hospitals.

                    My leCupboard taste test

                    On a recent visit to one vending machine, I ordered and sampled three different items, each of which was filling enough to stand on its own.

                    Bounahmidi recommended I start with a lighter dish as a sort of appetizer, then try a more filling main course, followed by a dessert. I tapped my selection on leCupboard’s touch screen, and was able to enter any dietary restrictions. Options included “avoid gluten” and “avoid nuts” — if I had used it, the feature would have excluded options that included those ingredients — but since I don’t have Celiac or an allergy, I skipped that step.

                    Within 30 seconds, my first entree came out ready to eat.

                    lecupboard vendingEach leCupboard dish comes with a label that lists ingredients and lays out its nutritional profile, including fiber, protein, and what leCupboard calls “healthful” fat, a tweak to standard nutrition labels that aligns with the latest nutritional science on fat. Healthy main dishes get labeled “Build,” while desserts — which mostly rely on ingredients like nuts and fruit — get labels like “Indulge.” 

                    My first item mimicked a poke bowl, the popular raw fish dish. But because leCupboard’s food is all vegan, my selection featured beets instead — a substitution that made me skeptical. After gingerly skewering a forkful of beet and some veggies, I took a bite.

                    poke bowl leCupboard

                    The flavors — lemon, seaweed, vegetable, delicious — danced on my palate. It was so good. I asked Bounahmidi how she had performed this magic trick.

                    The beets, she explained, were glazed in a lemon marinade then paired with a vegetable that tastes a bit like seaweed. A light carpet of black rice rounded out the dish, and a creamy, spicy sauce gave it some kick.

                    “I love cooking, and the flavors are designed to be craveable; to be satisfying. Just like any other food,” Bounahmidi said. 

                    Convenience over health

                    As she sees it, the reason most of us struggle to eat well is that convenient options usually only offer unhealthy food.

                    “We focus so much on what we’re eating on the weekends when we’re out with friends and then feel guilty for having dessert or over-eating, when really the problem isn’t what we’re eating on two days of the week — it’s what we’re eating on the other five,” she said.

                    With more than 100 meal-delivery apps to choose from across the US, it’s easy to see why many people no longer leave their offices for lunch. And those who work especially demanding hours or have more than one job often don’t have time to prepare or seek out a healthy lunch. In a recent survey, some 62% of professionals said they typically ate lunch at their desks, a phenomenon that’s heralded social media hashtags (#saddesklunch) and new social science vocabulary (“desktop dining”).

                    Most of “our choices aren’t actually choices. They’re made because they’re convenient,” Bounahmidi said.

                    In this context, vending machines — a technology that has barely changed since it was introduced as the “Automat” in 1912 — are booming. Since 1995, the number of vending machines in the US has grown 96% to a whopping 5.1 million, according to the New York Times.

                    The main course

                    Next up was my main dish: a falafel bowl inspired by Bounahmidi’s visits to Cairo. Like the others, it came in a reusable glass container that can be returned to the leCupboard staff at their Cafe location for a refund of $3. Eventually, Bounahmidi envisions that a second machine next to the first will allow customers to return their dishes and get their refunds automatically.

                    falafel 1 leCupboard

                    This dish was also delightful, but I think I’d heat the falafel next time for a slightly better flavor. Overall though, it exceeded my expectations. The freshness of the tomatoes and crunchiness of the kale shone through, and the falafel was savory and filling.

                    Bounahmidi said health is at the center of leCupboard’s mission. The initiative is the customer-facing portion of a public benefit corporation Bounahmidi founded called Looly, which has raised over $2 million in funding according to AngelList. She is currently working on a pilot project with several hospitals to design meals for people with specific dietary needs, including Celiac disease, Crohn’s, and diabetes.

                    I finished off my meal with a dessert called “le Versailles” — a plant-based chocolate mousse sprinkled with sea salt, raspberries, and pistachios.

                    dessert leCupboard

                    As a chocolate lover, this was my favorite part of the meal. The mouse was light and fluffy but rich, and the salt on top gave the chocolatey sweetness a hint of savory — my favorite combination. I could honestly see myself eating this at least once a week. And I’d be more than happy to eat the rest of the meals that often as well, as long as I could get $3 off the retail price after I return my glass container.

                    For that to happen, though, I’ll have to wait until leCupboard expands to some public locations, a goal Bounahmidi aims achieve within the next few weeks.

                    “On our lunch breaks we go down the street to what’s easy and cheap,” she said. “This solves that.”

                    SEE ALSO: Americans have been making a huge diet mistake for 100 years — here’s what they should do instead

                    Join the conversation about this story »

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